Pillow Vase by Kenneth White (#25)

Pillow Vase by Kenneth White
Pillow Vase by Kenneth White

Pillow Vase by Kenneth White (#25)

 $575.00

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12" tall

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Kenneth White is a fine and original Navajo potter. From gathering his clay to shaping, etching, and firing, he has mastered the ancient art of pottery. Kenneth refers to this large and stylized pot as his pillow vase, with an oval opening in the top. He adds the holy people, the corn of creation, protective arrowheads, and prayer feathers to this memorable piece of work.


About the artist:

Kenneth & Irene White KENNETH & IRENE WHITE : Navajo Pottery
Kenneth & Irene are a husband and wife team who live on the Northern Arizona portion of the Navajo Reservation. They have developed a unique style of pottery using a blend of traditional and contemporary techniques. The pottery is formed using the coil method, where coils of clay are built layer upon layer to form the bowl shape. Once the rounded bowl shape is achieved, it is smoothed and allowed to dry. After the piece is dried it is carved, painted and fired. Lastly, the pots are sealed using a traditional coating of pine pitch. See full biography | See all items by Kenneth & Irene White

Related categories:

Folk Art See all items in this category

Related legends:

Corn in Navajo Traditional Life

The Supernaturals also warn him of taboos connected with the use of corn. It should not be cooked until it is ripe nor eaten before it is fully cooked, or frost and floods will damage the crop. In the "vigil of the corn" ceremony the corn is fed with dried meat; if it were to be fed with corn it would thus consume itself, just as feeding meat to the masks would cause men to eat each other. When giving this warning Talking God refers to the time that ugly woman fed corn to the corn with result that " the people starved and men ate the flesh of other men."?

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Arrows

To the Navajo, flint is a sacred stone. Arrowheads are said to resemble the tips of the fiery bolt thrown by Thunder. Arrows equal lightning and some of the old warrior tales tell of mortals who wear flint armor and look like Gila Monster. In other legends, when Elder Brother sings flint songs, his voice jingles with the sound of blue flint, thunder flint, water flint, talking flint?

More about this legend

Feathers
Feather: As a common denominator the feather figures imortantly in Native American myth, method, and tribal practice. The feather is a metaphor for flight, a messenger to the spirit world. Feathers are used decoratively, as prayer symbols, and as designs of power. Attached to an arrow, the feather becomes the universal emblem of the hunt, of flight, of finding the mark? More about this legend

Pottery
The Navajo are relatively recent arrivals to the Southwest. They probably migrated from the north in the 16th Century thereby becoming a part of the Pueblo IV period. The Navajo have made pottery since their arrival; possibly they brought pottery with them during their southern migration. They made a plain and decorated pottery. The plain being considered the older style? More about this legend

Protection/Practice
Ambush, a shelter formed by two trees or shrubs whose branches intermingle, is a setting repeatedly occurring in myth, giving the explanation for various ritualistic properties-emetic frames, hoops, pokers, prayersticks, wood samples. A hero, hoping to shoot a mountain sheep or other animal he did not recognize as a god, lay behind the 'ambush trees,' but when the animal appeared, was numb until it had passed. The animal deity, revealing himself, taught the hero ceremonial lore? More about this legend

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This site was last updated on December 17, 2018.

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