Anasazi


Still another insists that the lizards and horned toads are the descendants of the Anasazi, who were turned into this form because they displeased the holy beings. Proof of their previous human status is found in the five fingers on each appendage. Pg. 85

Mae Thompson, a Navajo woman, tells another version of how the Anasazi living in Canyon de Chelly painted abstracts things, like wind and air, and caricatures of animals. The gods became angry, sent a whirlwind and fire, and destroyed life in the canyons and mesas. The black streaks of desert varnish that cover cliffs and rocks in the area are from the smoke and fire of this destruction. Pg. 92

Another explanation of Anasazi destruction by fire came from a Navajo man who said it was caused by the same meteorite that made Meteor Crater near Winslow, Arizona. Pg. 93

Ceramic or rock pipes, popularly known among historic puebloan groups as cloud-blowers, are also taken from sites for ceremonial purposes. Described as being stemless or L-shaped with a bowl that has a hole in its bottom, the pipe is used when putting a Mountain Earth bundle together. It is smoked and the fumes breathed on the package after the contents have been wrapped, so that the burning tobacco will summon clouds, bring rain, and increase fertility associated with the bundle. Pg. 105

The Anasazi also left behind gourd and leather rattles that the Dine' use in ceremonies. One type, in particular, is decorated with distinct star patterns the Pleiades, the North Star, and the Big Dipper and is used in the Enemyway ceremony. Pg. 108

...the yucca leaf drumstick used for tapping the basket(used as a drum in the Shootingway). Pg. 109

 

Sacred Land, Sacred View: Navajo Perceptions of the Four Corners Region; 1992, Robert S. McPherson.